Archive for May, 2010

Three Florescent Thundereggs

A little while ago I managed to acquire images of a few of my thundereggs under an ultraviolet lamp.  With my limited equipment, it was extremely hard work and I only managed to get three that turned out remotely successful, and even these needed a lot of processing afterwards to clear up the mess that my old camera made of working in such ultra-low light conditions.  I present them here – and I really hope to get more of these eventually.

Florescent Gehlberg Thunderegg

Florescent Gehlberg Thunderegg

First up is a Gehlberg specimen from Germany.  Most thundereggs fluoresce green but this was one of the few that startled me by showing a deep blue-purple colour.  It was very dim but I eventually managed to catch the above picture of it.  It reveals a remarkable almost 3d landscape of blue light.  Below is the same rock under natural light.

Gehlberg Thunderegg under natural light

Gehlberg Thunderegg under natural light

This next one is an Esterel from France.  This actually very unassuming stone under normal light began to glimmer a multicoloured constellation under ultraviolet.  This was even harder than the Gehlberg to catch with a long exposure and afterwards I had to manually paint out many many hundreds of pixels on the image to try and clear it up.  That was the only processing I did on all these images.

Florescent Esterel Thunderegg

Florescent Esterel Thunderegg

And here is the stone as normally seen.  Click on the image to visit the full gallery of Esterels, many of which are much more dramatic than this one!

Esterel Under Normal Light

Esterel Under Normal Light

And lastly, a very rare American location called Baby Doe surprised me by producing the most dramatic blazing florescence of all.  This stone produced a mesmerising display of green that was, by contrast, quite easy to catch on camera.

Florescent Baby Doe Thunderegg

Florescent Baby Doe Thunderegg

Baby Doe in Normal Light

Baby Doe in Normal Light

A better camera would produce better results than these I am sure, but even so, I am very pleased to have them, as they offer yet another way to look at these rocks and offer a haunting glimpse of how the world can look beyond our own perception.

Advertisements

Images in the Stones – Thunderegg Simulacra

One of the more over-used terms in the thunderegg world must surely be ‘scenic’, meaning that the stone apparently contains some kind of scenic view in its patterns.  Maybe, just maybe, if you really focus your imagination you can make out a landscape or skyscape, but it is only very occasionally indeed that the resemblance goes far beyond that.  I have encountered a few of these simulacra in my time collecting these rocks and it always makes for a very special stone.

One of these is a small Baumgartental stone I got from Germany.  I took one look at it and my jaw dropped, barely able to believe what I was seeing.  That pair of stones was hanging around for ages – polished one half, then moved house and left it in storage, then polished the other half . . . now, finally, the two halves have come together and I can at last present one of the best simulacra ever as it should be seen!

Two Evil Eyes

Two Evil Eyes

To celebrate, I have put together a small gallery of the best simulacra and representational thundereggs.  Not all of these are nice scenic landscapes that you can loose yourself in.  Some are stranger than that – have rather more worrying associations, maybe.  But all stand as a tribute to just how amazing just simple ‘rocks’ can actually be.

The Cave in the Lake District

The Cave in the Lake District

Ok – here’s the sort of thing people think of when talking of a scenic thunderegg.  Perhaps we are in the English Lake District now. We are standing in a cave in the hills. The entrance is trailing with ferns and tree roots, all covered with moss. In front of us is a low hill of pink heather with a rocky valley to the left, presumably containing a stream. The stream leads to the Atlantic Ocean, lying calm under one of those stormy skies featuring dark clouds and sunlight combined. All is quiet and serene – but also foreboding. Bad weather and heavy rain is coming – so best stay right here in the cave and keep safe and dry!  This is a Fallen Tree thunderegg from Oregon, and yes i know i published the same image last time, but i had to eulogize it here as well!

The Faceless Grin

The Faceless Grin

And a less romantic simulacrum!  All I know is that I would not like to wake up in the night and find this thing staring down at me.  This is a Dugway Geode from Utah.

In the Town Ditch with Dead Algae and Worms

In the Town Ditch with Dead Algae and Worms

Ok, so if you are looking for ‘romantic’ comparisons filled with new-agey earth magic, look somewhere else!  This extraordinary stone is a different kind of simulacra.  It reminds me of poking around in ditches when I was a kid looking for pond life, getting covered in mud and slime and enjoying every minute of it.  Moldering moss-covered twigs and squirming black worms (planarian?).  Friend Ranch Thunderegg from Oregon.

The Smoke Ghost (The Cat)

The Smoke Ghost (The Cat)

A complex enough rock that, in itself, reminds me of a volcanic spring encrusted with mineral growths and/or bacterial mats.  But it is the curious two-eyed creature in the centre that is its most remarkable feature.  Cat?  Or something else?  Another Friend Ranch Stone.  There is definately a bit of magic in the ground there.

Yesterday’s Congealed Spaghetti that your Flatmate Left Overnight in the Saucepan

Yesterday’s Congealed Spaghetti that your Flatmate Left Overnight in the Saucepan

I did warn you – no romantic comparisons here!  I think the title says it all.  This is a Richardson thunderegg.

The Triangle

The Triangle

Ok, so this isn’t so much a ‘scenic’ stone or Simulacrum (though maybe a moonlit seascape?) as a spectacular example of nature forming a geometric shape, which is rare enough in a non-crystalline process.  This is from Desolation Canyon, Oregon.

The Jellyfish

The Jellyfish

Romanticists might be thinking ‘ice sculpture’ or something – but I am definitely seeing protoplasmic jelly here!  A jellyfish drifting through the deeps – or maybe an egg batch of some kind, in jelly of course.  The sort of think you might find on seaweed at low tide.  The stone is from White Fir Springs, Oregon.

The Yonic Symbol

The Yonic Symbol

As a matter of fact, yonic symbols are not exactly rare in thundereggs if you look for them – no doubt thanks to the splits and opening up of the rock that occurs.  However, it would be hard to imagine a more direct naturally generated fertility symbol than this somber thunderegg from Zwikau-Planitz, Germany.

The ?

The ?

Well ok, I am not really sure WHAT this is a simulacrum of, but it has to be of something!  a) – the perfect square crossed out by b) – that almost perfect diagonal crack and the whole thing containing c) what looks like a collapsing floor and d) some mysterious soft ball sitting on it.  This little thunderegg from Contact, Nevada looks like the symbol of an imaginary secret society or some weird road sign – or – or something . . .

The Cartoon Cat

The Cartoon Cat

A transparent cartoon cat with some decidedly weird anatomy.  A big head, whiskers on each side.  Two ears.  Legs and a tail.  A heart.  And one bizarre orb in its head!  Cyclops cat or transparent cat with brain showing . . . I dunno!  Thunderegg from McDermitt, Oregon/Nevada.

The Blue Rockpool

The Blue Rockpool

If there’s one simulacrum there’s no shortage of in thundereggs it is rock pools – thanks to moss agate they are everywhere with varying degrees of realism.  This one though is one of the better ones, a beautiful thunderegg from the Richardson Ranch Opal Bed in Oregon.  It if wasn’t for the few cracks, it really would look like some pool full of water and tufts of seaweed.

Rotten Cheese

Rotten Cheese

My last unromantic comparison, I promise – but what choice do I have?  Look at that texture!  Look at the maggots crawling through it!  Look at the reeking brown fluid seeping out of it . . .  This is another Richardson thunderegg.  There is definitely something curious in the soil there, for that location to produce so many bizarre specimens.

Arctic Landscape

Arctic Seascape

This one is quite subtle but, when you allow yourself to drift away into it, suddenly you are in a world of distant ice shelves, floating icebergs and a wild cold stormy sky.  This remains one of my favorites – one of those stones that can be gazed at for hours.  Just like all these most magical of rocks.

The Magic of Fallen Tree, Oregon

Welcome to the new Eibonvale Thunderegg Blog.  By way of a test and a first post, here is a showcase gallery of one of my favourite Thunderegg locations – Fallen Tree.  This coincides with a substantial update of this location on the main Gallery with several very striking new stones – so enjoy!

Fallen Tree thundereggs come from the Mill Creek Wilderness area in Oregon and they are among the most subtly beautiful stones in the world, in my opinion.  It is true that they can become a bit generic but this little gallery hopefully demonstrates that there is more to this location than just the basic ‘type specimen’ and that they can sometimes be extraordinarily beautiful.  The colours here are very subtle – greens, greys and light browns, which means that the occasional appearance of other colours stands out spectacularly.  Rust-coloured stains are common, as is opal (sometimes blue), moss agate and zeolite.

Scenic Fallen Tree - Sea View from a Cave
Scenic Fallen Tree – Sea View from a Cave
Quirky Opal Thunderegg with 'Floor'
Quirky Opal Thunderegg with ‘Floor’
Complex and bizzare Fallen Tree Thunderegg
Complex and bizzare Fallen Tree Thunderegg
Classic Fallen Tree Opal Thunderegg
Classic Fallen Tree Opal Thunderegg
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Orbs
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Orbs
Small and cute specimen with opal
Small and cute specimen with opal
Simple and elegant specimen with levelling lines
Simple and elegant specimen with levelling lines
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Unusual Centre
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Unusual Centre

Click here to visit the Eibonvale Thunderegg GalleryFallen Tree Page