Archive for March, 2019

Two New German Locations

Two interesting new locations have been uploaded to the gallery now.  I know very little about the first one, save that it is from the Thuringia Forest.  In appearance, it is substantially different to anything else I have seen from there.  This lcation is simply known as Wasch:

Wasch01

Wasch Thunderegg

Next up is a new Saxony location alongside the white ghosts of the kaolin pits – Börtewitz.  And it’s a specimen I am pretty much in love with!  The stones that I have seen from here are distinguished from the other locations (Querbitzsch, Gröppendorf etc.) by being much harder and heavier – a solid matrix that takes a shine.

Bortewitz01

Börtewitz Thunderegg

 

Some New German Specimens

wendishain03

I just managed to perform an update to the gallery, including some nice new German specimens.  The above is a Wendishain Thunderegg and definitely an improvement on what was there before.  One of my most prized saxonty specimens.  Here is another Wendishain spcimen:

wendishain04

Also uploaded is a tiny yet lovely specimen from the super-rare location Meisenstein – only the second I have ever seen:

Meisenstein2

A Seebachsfelsen thunderegg showcasing the most beautiful form the location can take, with green-tinged matrix and colourful banded agate.  This one could use reworking to get rid of the chips on the face, but is still a beautiful specimen:

seebachsfelsen09

And lastly, a few new specimens of the most ghostly of the white ghosts of the kaolin pits, Gröppendorf.  These stark white stones, less common than their cousin Querbitzsch, are starting to come across with a distinct identity of their own.

Groppendorf07

Groppendorf09

 

A Thunderegg that Changed Over Time

It’s one of my most prized thundereggs – a large Gottlob specimen from Germany with amethyst.  But also, this is one of the very few thundereggs I’ve ever seen that have changed over time.  When I first got it, about 5 years ago or thereabouts, I scanned it as usual and added it to my gallery:

Gottlob10

However, over time, the agate lost its clarity – the colours brightened.  Preparing to sell it’s other half as part of a downsizing, I finally got round to imaging the rock a second time – again by scanner.  Side by side, the difference is quite dramatic.

Gottlob 04

German thundereggs are much older than most of the US specimens, yet this one transformed in just a few years after being dug up.  I have two shelves full of Gottlobs, but this is the only one to have transformed to anything close to this extent.  It’s still beautiful – maybe even more so.

 

Check out more Gottlobs here: http://www.thundereggs.co.uk/germany/index_Gottlob.html