Posts tagged ‘agate’

Juchem Agate – A Fascinating Non-Thunderegg Interlude

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Here’s a real curiosity to keep you going during these wild days while I am deep in book launches rather than mud.  It’s not a thunderegg, it’s an agate nodule from the Juchem quarry, Germany – and it is also one of the most extraordinary textures I have seen in a while.  No matter how beautiful and perfect some banded agate may be, once you have seen it, you have seen it.  In this case, it is agate with a riddle – agate that twists the brain, as you try and work out how on earth it formed and unpick its complexity.  There are two types of calcite and two types of agate – or possibly more of both – that have all grown on top of each other and replaced each other.  White and pink is agate – clear and black is calcite.  A very complex rock.

The Joy of Ocos

They may be one of the most common of all the geodes, almost ubiquitous in any number of rock shops, trinket stalls, museum gift shops etc. – but that shouldn’t blind us to what amazing things they are. Their delicacy and patterning is unique, washed through with gorgeous feathery ‘cloud agate’. This plus the complex crystal caves filled with everything from Amethyst to Goethite and beyond make them possibly one of the most remarkable agates in the world when at their best – and I don’t say that lightly.

For all their ubiquity, it is surprisingly hard to find information about these, maybe partly since nobody can agree on the exact name. I have seen Oco, Coco, Ocho, Ocos etc. Oco is the name given on the Mindat website, so I will go with that one for now. However, I only recently became aware of the fact that there is possibly more than one Brazilian location involved. The classic Oco comes from Três Pinheiros, Fountoura Xavier, Rio Grande do Sul. These stones are dug out of the red-brown earth of the region and form a welcome extra ‘crop’ for the farmers. The following though, is almost certainly a Parana Cloud Agate – Similar but subtly different:

Like a lot of the stones out of Brazil, there is a certain vagueness about their origin – and I can’t pretend to know much at all.  But I am totally blown away by the delicate patterns and sheer intricacy of these stones.  I have now launched a gallery of them in the ‘non-thundereggs’ section of the website.

The Magic of Fallen Tree, Oregon

Welcome to the new Eibonvale Thunderegg Blog.  By way of a test and a first post, here is a showcase gallery of one of my favourite Thunderegg locations – Fallen Tree.  This coincides with a substantial update of this location on the main Gallery with several very striking new stones – so enjoy!

Fallen Tree thundereggs come from the Mill Creek Wilderness area in Oregon and they are among the most subtly beautiful stones in the world, in my opinion.  It is true that they can become a bit generic but this little gallery hopefully demonstrates that there is more to this location than just the basic ‘type specimen’ and that they can sometimes be extraordinarily beautiful.  The colours here are very subtle – greens, greys and light browns, which means that the occasional appearance of other colours stands out spectacularly.  Rust-coloured stains are common, as is opal (sometimes blue), moss agate and zeolite.

Scenic Fallen Tree - Sea View from a Cave
Scenic Fallen Tree – Sea View from a Cave
Quirky Opal Thunderegg with 'Floor'
Quirky Opal Thunderegg with ‘Floor’
Complex and bizzare Fallen Tree Thunderegg
Complex and bizzare Fallen Tree Thunderegg
Classic Fallen Tree Opal Thunderegg
Classic Fallen Tree Opal Thunderegg
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Orbs
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Orbs
Small and cute specimen with opal
Small and cute specimen with opal
Simple and elegant specimen with levelling lines
Simple and elegant specimen with levelling lines
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Unusual Centre
Fallen Tree Thunderegg with Unusual Centre

Click here to visit the Eibonvale Thunderegg GalleryFallen Tree Page